Imam at Salman Abedi mosque recorded ‘calling for armed jihad’

    9
    0


    Imam at Didsbury mosque where Manchester bomber and his family worshipped was recorded ‘calling for armed jihad’ in sermon six months before deadly attack

    An imam at the mosque where Manchester Arena bomber Salman Abedi and his family prayed was delivered a sermon calling for jihad.

    Mustafa Graf encouraged followers to ‘take action’ at the Didsbury Mosque in Manchester on December 16, 2016.

    That was just six months before Salman Abedi detonated a suicide bomb killing 22 at an Ariana Grande concert in the city. 

    Imam Mustafa Graf (pictured) encouraged followers to 'take action' at the Didsbury Mosque in Manchester on December 16, 2016

    Imam Mustafa Graf (pictured) encouraged followers to ‘take action’ at the Didsbury Mosque in Manchester on December 16, 2016

    It is unclear whether Abedi or any of his family attended the mosque on the day of the sermon, but he bought a ticket for the Ariana Grande concert 10 days later.

    Delivering the sermon about the suffering in Syria, the Imam called jihad – which often means waging holy war – a ‘source of pride and dignity’, according to the BBC.

    The sermon delivered at the time of a bombing of Aleppo, includes prayers for ‘Mujahideen’ – a term used for a group fighting armed jihad abroad.

    ‘We ask Allah to grant them Mujahideen – our brothers and sisters right now in Aleppo and Syria and Iraq – to grant them victory’, he says.

    ‘Jihad for the sake of Allah is the source of pride and dignity for this nation’.

    Salman Abedi killed 22 at Manchester Arena when he detonated a suicide bomb in the foyer as happy families left an Ariana Grande concert 

    Salman Abedi killed 22 at Manchester Arena when he detonated a suicide bomb in the foyer as happy families left an Ariana Grande concert 

     Islamic scholars believe the sermon, if heard by Abedi, may have inspired him to commit the act of terror

     Islamic scholars believe the sermon, if heard by Abedi, may have inspired him to commit the act of terror

    In another passage he says ‘now it is time to act and do something’.

    ‘Brothers and sisters, it is time to act, not only to talk… Lots of borthers stay behind unfortunately, they love Islam and Muslims but they do nothing about the support of their brothers and sisters,’ he said.

    Graf criticised Europe, America and the ‘so-called civilised world’ for watching on as the war ravaged Syria.

    ‘They know that Iran, Russia and the militias are killing humans in Syria and they do nothing. Well in fact they helped Iranian, Russian and others to kill Muslims over there,’ he said.

    Abedi and his family regularly attended the mosque and his father sometimes led the call to prayer.

    In the days after the attack Graf came out an assured the public the mosque did not back the views of Abedi.

    Usama Hasan, Head of Islamic Studies at Quilliam, said he wouldn't be surprised if Salman Abedi's horrific suicide bombing was partly inspired by the sermon

    Usama Hasan, Head of Islamic Studies at Quilliam, said he wouldn’t be surprised if Salman Abedi’s horrific suicide bombing was partly inspired by the sermon

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

    ‘He is psychologically and practically brainwashing young people into either travelling or to do something to take action,’ Islamic scholar Shaykh Rehan said

    He posted on Facebook: ‘As a community we have lost many hundreds of people who bravely fought and defeated Isis in Sirte, Libya, only a few months ago, and so we are affected by grief again.’  

    However, two Muslim scholars said they both believe the language of the sermon represents a call for armed jihad.

    ‘He’s giving them the narrative of them against us’, Islamic scholar Shaykh Rehan told BBC News.

    ‘The jihad he’s referring to here is actually being on the battlefield, there’s no if’s and no buts in this’.

    ‘He is psychologically and practically brainwashing young people into either travelling or to do something to take action.’

    Footage was obtained of Graff in Libya on the front line of the 2011 revolution talking about waiting for orders to attack in a battlefield interview

    Footage was obtained of Graff in Libya on the front line of the 2011 revolution talking about waiting for orders to attack in a battlefield interview

    He also attended a demonstration in Manchester against a secular Libyan General who was fighting against Islamist militia in 2015

    He also attended a demonstration in Manchester against a secular Libyan General who was fighting against Islamist militia in 2015

    Months later the same group held another protest in London, in which Abedi (right) was filmed holding up a banner

    Months later the same group held another protest in London, in which Abedi (right) was filmed holding up a banner

    Usama Hasan, Head of Islamic Studies at Quilliam, agreed and told BBC News that ‘from the context and the way these texts [the religious passages quoted within the sermon] are used they are clearly referring to military jihad, to armed jihad’.

    ‘I have known the Islamic discourse for pretty much 40 years, from being a child in this country and worldwide, and the Mujahideen are the group fighting armed jihad’. 

    Mr Hasan became emotional after hearing the sermon recording, appearing to despair that it was being preached in Britain.

    ‘Oh dear, dear oh dear,’ he said. ‘He’s reiterated the call not only to stop living a normal life but to do something drastic, to be with the small group of “true Muslims”.’

    ‘Sadly I wouldn’t be surprised if Salman Abedi’s horrific suicide bombing was partly inspired by this sermon.’

    ‘If he was in this congregation, I fear that this sermon may well have contributed to his resolve to “punish” civilians in Britain for somehow being complicit in the murder of Muslims in Syria.’

    As part of their investigation the BBC uncovered links between Abedi and Graf.

    Graf refused to be interviewed by the BBC, but denied he ever called for armed jihad or preached Islamic extremism

    Graf refused to be interviewed by the BBC, but denied he ever called for armed jihad or preached Islamic extremism

    Mustafa Graf assured the community after the Manchester bombing they were in no way linked to terror incidents and did not recognise the actions of Salman Abedi 

    Mustafa Graf assured the community after the Manchester bombing they were in no way linked to terror incidents and did not recognise the actions of Salman Abedi 

    Footage was obtained of Graff in Libya on the front line of the 2011 revolution talking about waiting for orders to attack in a battlefield interview.

    He also attended a demonstration in Manchester against a secular Libyan General who was fighting against Islamist militia in 2015.

    The event was organised by the so-called 17th of February Forum which is led by Graf.

    Months later the same group held another protest in London, in which Abedi was filmed holding up a banner.

    Manchester bombing victim Martin Hibbert also listened to the sermon and said he was ‘speechless’ at Graf’s words.

    His daughter Eve was severely brain damaged, unable to speak, eat, or move the left side of her body.

    ‘I’d probably take him round to see Eve. I don’t think I’d need to say anything.’

    At least five men who attended the mosque either went to fight in Syria or were jailed for supporting ISIS, according to the BBC.

    Manchester bombing victim Martin Hibbert (right) also listened to the sermon and said he was 'speechless' at Graf's words, and said he would like the Imam to meet his daughter Eve (left) who was badly brain damaged in the bombing

    Manchester bombing victim Martin Hibbert (right) also listened to the sermon and said he was ‘speechless’ at Graf’s words, and said he would like the Imam to meet his daughter Eve (left) who was badly brain damaged in the bombing

    Scenes of emotion after the Manchester Arena bombing took place in May 2017 killing 22

    Scenes of emotion after the Manchester Arena bombing took place in May 2017 killing 22

    Mustafa Graf denies he ever called for armed jihad or preached Islamic extremism.

    In a statement, the trustees of Didsbury Mosque said Mustafa Graf’s sermon was highlighting the plight of Syrians and his use of the words ‘jihad’ and ‘mujahideen’ had been misinterpreted.

    ‘We do not tolerate or instigate any form of preaching that breaches both Islamic principles and the laws of England and Wales,’ it said.

    It is believed at least five men who have attended Didsbury Mosque have either travelled to Syria or have been jailed for terrorism offences.

    The trustees of Didsbury Mosque say none of these men visited the mosque.

    Advertisement

    LEAVE A REPLY

    Please enter your comment!
    Please enter your name here